IRM In-House Training

In-house training takes place on your company’s premises with no outside members of the public.

in-house training room

Other than the convenience and flexibility, there can also be a significant discount.

Advantages of in-house training:

  • Attractive discount
  • Flexible days – choose the training days that best suit you and your team (subject to availability)
  • Flexible location
  • Course content customised to suit your requirement
  • Practical group-work components that are great for team building

We can run in-house training courses in most cities and towns in Australia, New Zealand and some parts of Asia, including:


New Zealand:

  • Auckland
  • Christchurch
  • Wellington
  • Others – please contact us

Asia / Other Oceania:

  • Hong Kong
  • Jakarta (Indonesia)
  • Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)
  • Manila (Philippines)
  • Phnom Penh (Cambodia)
  • Port Moresby (Papua New Guinea)
  • Seoul (South Korea)
  • Singapore
  • Tokyo (Japan)

Who We Are…

IRM Training have been a leading Australian provider of Business Analysis, Project Management and Leadership training services to industry and government since 1989.

Our training instructors are experts in the field who have extensive hands-on and training experience. They’ve all “been there done that” and at the same time know how to share their knowledge with a mixed group of people in a way that is both informative and enjoyable for everyone.

Our course materials, which are developed in house, focus on practicality while at the same time conform to industry standards. Our Business Analysis courses conform to the BABOK® and are endorsed by the IIBA®.


Who We Train…

Telstra Australia, Woolworths Ltd, ANZ Bank, Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission, Vanguard Investments, Ento, ACGP, Department of Health, VicRoads, Origin Energy, Monash IVF Group, La Trobe University, ME Bank, Pacific Brands, Macquarie Bank, Blue Care, Department of Human Services, Bunnings, Department of Planning Transport and Infrastructure, University of Queensland, Geoscience, Downer, Linfox, EE Muir, Westpac, Department of Education, University of Sydney, NIB Health Insurance, John Holland Group, Foxtel, Murray PHN, ACNA, National Archives of Australia, AMP Limited, Labware Australia, Melton City Council, RMIT University… and many more.


Our Training Courses…

IRM provide professional development courses of between 2 and 4 days in length for teams relating to the topic of business analysis. Our instructors have been teaching business analysis techniques for 20+ years and have expertise in this area. We offer a variety of courses for business analyst groups. We also provide in-house training and public courses for scaled agile using the SAFe (Scaled Agile Framework) methodology and exceptional soft skills courses for general business, team building and analysis.

Some of our clients combine two or more of our courses to produce a longer course duration.


In-House Training FAQ

I want a tailored course – do you do that?
Much of our work is done in-house, presenting a tailored version of one of our standard courses.

Usually we can quickly modify a course to suit your circumstances, culture and standards. Frequently there is no charge for this, as we have done this many times and we have the materials available. If you want something special for your in-house training, like a particular case study built into the course, then there will be a charge.

Are your courses hands-on?
All of our courses are workshops. This means that much of the time (typically around 50% but it can be more) is spent on practical work. Some of this is individual work, most of it is done in small teams.

The courses are designed to maximise the learning curve, and this is usually achieved by a mix of activities – quizzes, demonstrations, examples, discussion, simulations, teamwork.

I want this course but can I have it in less time?
If you want a five-day course presented in say, three days, then it is a different course. There is no ‘unnecessary’ material built into the courses to fill time. We would not still be in business if we did that.

After many years in the training business we know what can – and cannot – be done. So if you want material from a four-day Business Analysis course presented in two days then we are unlikely to attempt it. The only way to achieve this is to either remove some basic material or to remove the practical work. The latter option doesn’t work – people don’t learn that way. If you and we agree together that you don’t require all the material then we can consider tailoring the course to suit you.

Remember that the learning process has to be designed carefully if it is to be successful – a training course isn’t just about presenting facts.

Can we have a case study that reflects our business?
We understand where you’re coming from – if you’re in the insurance business, then it might be easier for you and your delegates to be able to relate to the training material more easily if it also relates to the insurance business. Case studies usually take considerable design and development time.

They have to meet the following criteria: they must bear some resemblance to the real world the situation must be readily understood with a minimum of reading they must challenge the delegate they must be solvable using the tools and techniques being taught there must be sufficient ‘meat’ in them to allow for a number of solutions they must stand up under examination. The design and development is much akin to building software systems – and takes almost as long!

What case studies are not for…

A case study is not teaching the delegate about their business – whether it’s insurance, tax, or manufacturing. If you really want this, then are better ways of achieving it. The issue with developing a business-specific case study – apart from the time and cost – is that there are always some delegates who will become involved in the details of the case study itself and the intricacies of the business operations. It often becomes an inward-looking debate on policies and procedures.

The real purpose of the case study is to allow the delegate to apply the newly-acquired skills on a subject that makes sense and allows a solution to be developed. The actual subject matter is of little consequence.

In most of our workshops, we are teaching delegates to think their way through business issues so that when they meet the real issues they have a process – and some experience using it. We can’t teach them what the answers will be – but we can teach them how to reach the answers!

I’d like to organise in-house training – what benefits & outcomes can I include in my request for funding?

Many companies use in-house training to “kick-start” projects or as a catalyst for change. A common approach when writing an internal business case for a training course or program is the 5 step method:

1 ) Training Objective

A brief paragraph to describe what’s in it for the company. A training objective is a statement of the focus and direction of the in-house training. For example: “to equip analysts with the skills necessary to undertake a new project” “to train analysts in formal techniques as part of the adoption of standardised processes for capturing and documenting requirements”.

2) Organisational Outcomes

Describes the specific outcomes that the organisation will get as a result of the training. Examples can include:

  • less rework and lower costs
  • tighter control of specs
  • higher quality project deliverables
  • better client communications
  • improved client relations
  • operational cost reductions through the use of consistent procedures
  • staff involvement and ownership of progress
  • greater milestone control

Organisational outcomes work best when aligned with corporate objectives such as better quality/fit of deliverables to business needs. This in turn supports increased competitiveness of the organisation. Other organisational benefits include reduced operational costs and reduced time/cost overruns on projects.

3) Staff outcomes

Staff development and motivation are direct benefits of training. When run in-house for the whole team, outcomes include:

  • focusing the whole team on the business objective
  • greater ownership of deliverables
  • everyone on the same wavelength
  • demonstrating the organisation’s commitment to skills development

4) Cost Benefit Analysis or Cost Justification

This should be tied in with organisational outcomes and quantified wherever possible. Methods for quantifying benefits can range from the general e.g. cost of training represents 2% of the fully burdened cost of an analyst and the projected workplace efficiency improvement is 10%… through to the specific… 30% of staff time is spent re-defining requirements after the prototype phase, by improving the initial requirements definition phase, the re-work overhead is projected to drop to 10%.

5)  Measuring results

This step has already been defined in the Cost Benefit Section above so is relatively straightforward to express as a performance metric. Remember that no one becomes a brain surgeon overnight (despite what they say in the How-To books!). Once staff have acquired skills they need time and practice to apply and incorporate them in their work activity. Set realistic time-frames for measuring improvement. Balance a desire to show payback in the short term against the fact that a person with new or improved skills can apply their expertise over many years.


Fill out the form below to enquire or to book your in-house course.

In-House Training Enquiry Form

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